Wednesday , November 30 2022
Home / Dirk Niepelt / Mortality Externalities of CO2-Emissions

Mortality Externalities of CO2-Emissions

Summary:
In the Quarterly Journal of Economics (137, 4), a group of authors estimates that the mean global increase in mortality risk due to climate change, accounting for adaptation benefits and costs, is valued at roughly 3.2% of global GDP in 2100 under a high-emissions scenario. Notably, today’s cold locations are projected to benefit, while today’s poor and hot locations have large projected damages. Finally, our central estimates indicate that the release of an additional ton of CO2 today will cause mortality-related damages of .6 under a high-emissions scenario, with an interquartile range accounting for both econometric and climate uncertainty of [−.8, .0].

Topics:
Dirk Niepelt considers the following as important: , , , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Dirk Niepelt writes Economics PhD Admissions

Dirk Niepelt writes Most-Regretted College Majors

Dirk Niepelt writes Robert Wolff’s “Original Wisdom”

Dirk Niepelt writes Mariana: CBDCs in Automated Market Makers

In the Quarterly Journal of Economics (137, 4), a group of authors estimates that

the mean global increase in mortality risk due to climate change, accounting for adaptation benefits and costs, is valued at roughly 3.2% of global GDP in 2100 under a high-emissions scenario. Notably, today’s cold locations are projected to benefit, while today’s poor and hot locations have large projected damages. Finally, our central estimates indicate that the release of an additional ton of CO2 today will cause mortality-related damages of $36.6 under a high-emissions scenario, with an interquartile range accounting for both econometric and climate uncertainty of [−$7.8, $73.0].

Dirk Niepelt
Dirk Niepelt is Director of the Study Center Gerzensee and Professor at the University of Bern. A research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR, London), CESifo (Munich) research network member and member of the macroeconomic committee of the Verein für Socialpolitik, he served on the board of the Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics and was an invited professor at the University of Lausanne as well as a visiting professor at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) at Stockholm University.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *